Help! Why do I need this??!!

User 126812 Photo


Registered User
12 posts

I just got the email about the new Bootstrap Builder. I'm kind of at a loss here. Several months ago, I bought the shiny new RSD. I struggled through the learning curve and built a couple of my websites with it. I'm very happy with them. Then a couple of months ago, out came with RFF. Ooooh, even shinier. I'm not sure why, but you convinced me that I really needed this, even though I really have no idea what makes this so much more special than the RSD. Now there is BB. I can't find a good description of what is so different about it, but your email makes me feel that if I don't buy it right this moment life as we know it will cease to exist. RFF is still in beta, for Pete's sake!!! Is RSD now passé? Is RFF an antique? I feel like I bought a hamburger, then you came out with a cheeseburger and now a bacon cheeseburger.
I am still really green when it comes to website design and its associated software. I know I am very much not alone in this. So, I'll ask the question and hopefully open the floodgates so that I and others can understand the differences and know what we really need. Thanks in advance!
User 2088758 Photo


Senior Advisor
2,669 posts

Hi Bryan,

I just answered this question here... its just a different choice when it comes to web design. FF and BS have been around for a long time... Coffeecup is just putting together a nice App that brings in all these frameworks together and making it easier to use. Below are the differences between BS and FF

http://www.coffeecup.com/forums/bootstrap-builder/bootstrap-builder-v-foundation-framer/?post_id=265310#post265310
Taking over the world one website at a time!

Steve Kolish
www.misterwebguy.com

YouTube Channel:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL8qVv … ttneYaMSJA
User 399746 Photo


Sales & Support Manager
125 posts

Bryan Daniels wrote:
I just got the email about the new Bootstrap Builder. I'm kind of at a loss here. Several months ago, I bought the shiny new RSD. I struggled through the learning curve and built a couple of my websites with it. I'm very happy with them. Then a couple of months ago, out came with RFF. Ooooh, even shinier. I'm not sure why, but you convinced me that I really needed this, even though I really have no idea what makes this so much more special than the RSD. Now there is BB. I can't find a good description of what is so different about it, but your email makes me feel that if I don't buy it right this moment life as we know it will cease to exist. RFF is still in beta, for Pete's sake!!! Is RSD now passé? Is RFF an antique? I feel like I bought a hamburger, then you came out with a cheeseburger and now a bacon cheeseburger.
I am still really green when it comes to website design and its associated software. I know I am very much not alone in this. So, I'll ask the question and hopefully open the floodgates so that I and others can understand the differences and know what we really need. Thanks in advance!


Hey Brian,
There is a lot of debate online regarding which framework to use, Foundation or Bootstrap. But, one isn’t necessarily better than the other. They’re both awesome at building professional designs. It all just depends on your personal preference. In a coding environment, there are a lot of differences. For example, Bootstrap's predefined CSS tends to make sites look like they were made with Bootstrap, while Foundation is easier for customization. Bootstrap also uses pixels and Foundation uses rems. What's nice about working with these frameworks in the CoffeeCup environment, is that we make it easy to customize the CSS classes for unique looks. Plus, we lifted the unit limitations by incorporating the unit switcher.

Browser support differs too. For example, Foundation doesn’t support anything less than IE9, whereas Bootstrap supports IE8.

We have big plans for RSD coming in the next update. Foundation Framer too! So your purchases are not antique. We are just trying to cover all the frameworks that are popular among the web community. :)
Learn the essentials with these tips on Site Designer V3. You'll be making awesome, code-free responsive sites like a boss.
User 38185 Photo


Ambassador
25 posts

Personally, I'm all about options. Considering the $$$ I shell out to Adobe, I don't mind paying Coffeecup to provide alternate versions of its software built for using different frameworks. Don't worry -- If RSD works for you, great! Continue to use it and feel secure knowing it will still be supported.

When it comes to my business, decisions are made based on a client's needs first and foremost, but also maintainability. Some designs are easier to create using Foundation, others Bootstrap and others still RSD. I'm just giddy that Coffeecup is providing us with all of these options using their responsive toolset.
User 126812 Photo


Registered User
12 posts

Thank you, Steve, Suzanne and Ed, for your quick answers.
Suzanne, you touched on something really important here. There are a LOT of windows XP users still out there who have hit their ceiling at IE8. I realize we can't design for all old browsers, but that seems pretty important. Those are the little details that we need to know
User 515127 Photo


Registered User
109 posts

I a fan of, and I promote CoffeeCup products to people. One of the issues mentioned by Ed Spader certainly rings true with me as well. Given the drain on wallet that Adobe represents - ($50 a month for Creative Cloud adds up, and yeah, I bought a couple Adobe retail Suites before I migrated to CC) I don't work up too much resentment about buying something now and then - the folks at Coffee Cup need to eat and pay bills too.

There are two kinds of clients - the ones that know it all or think they do because they read somewhere that the newest shiniest sites are built with <fill in the framework de jour>, and tell YOU what they want you to use (if they get enamored with Foundation or Bootstrap, then with these two programs mean you can say sure, no problem, without facing a nasty learning curve. Or you may find an add-on/plug in that assumes a bootstrap or foundation framework is resident - and decide you really need that plug in to deliver the results you promised or want to promise, to get the job.

Then there are situations where the client says (my strong, strongly preferred clients) I want a website, I want it to do this and that, how much? They don't care how you do it, just so it gets done.
User 2088758 Photo


Senior Advisor
2,669 posts

gllincoln wrote:
I a fan of, and I promote CoffeeCup products to people. One of the issues mentioned by Ed Spader certainly rings true with me as well. Given the drain on wallet that Adobe represents - ($50 a month for Creative Cloud adds up, and yeah, I bought a couple Adobe retail Suites before I migrated to CC) I don't work up too much resentment about buying something now and then - the folks at Coffee Cup need to eat and pay bills too.

There are two kinds of clients - the ones that know it all or think they do because they read somewhere that the newest shiniest sites are built with <fill in the framework de jour>, and tell YOU what they want you to use (if they get enamored with Foundation or Bootstrap, then with these two programs mean you can say sure, no problem, without facing a nasty learning curve. Or you may find an add-on/plug in that assumes a bootstrap or foundation framework is resident - and decide you really need that plug in to deliver the results you promised or want to promise, to get the job.

Then there are situations where the client says (my strong, strongly preferred clients) I want a website, I want it to do this and that, how much? They don't care how you do it, just so it gets done.


I 100% agree with you here! I think the more options as a designer the better... a good mechanic has many tools in his tool box. I feel the same way as a designer.:cool:
Taking over the world one website at a time!

Steve Kolish
www.misterwebguy.com

YouTube Channel:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL8qVv … ttneYaMSJA
User 2473003 Photo


Registered User
28 posts

Good on you Bryan, you framed the exact question I wanted to ask, but much more eloquently. I maintain websites for several Not For Profit organisations plus my own. I'm a real Coffee Cup fan and I'm very much a newbie compared to power users, so I didn't have a clue what this new product was about. I bought VSD, then RSD and RFF. Then when the offer for Bootstrap Builder came out I thought "what the". Thanks to those who replied to your post, it puts it in context for me.
I guess I'm in an enviable position in that my customers are grateful for what I do (for free) and do not demand anything. At least I can now feel comfortable staying with RFF and not worry that I'm missing out on something.
User 2660090 Photo


Registered User
88 posts

Bryan Daniels wrote:
Thank you, Steve, Suzanne and Ed, for your quick answers.
Suzanne, you touched on something really important here. There are a LOT of windows XP users still out there who have hit their ceiling at IE8. I realize we can't design for all old browsers, but that seems pretty important. Those are the little details that we need to know
Perhaps I'm being ignorant, but how many people are still using a web browser that was released in 2009? It's wrong on many levels — and it's a security risk.

There may still be a few people still using Windows XP, but you can be pretty sure by now that the vast, vast majority of people are on Windows 7 at least. I know that Internet Explorer 8 is the highest compatible version for Windows XP, but who actually uses it anymore?
User 38185 Photo


Ambassador
25 posts

Andrew Moss wrote:
[quote=Bryan Daniels]Perhaps I'm being ignorant, but how many people are still using a web browser that was released in 2009? It's wrong on many levels — and it's a security risk.


Probably more than you realize and more than I want to think about! :P

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