The Intention of RSD


Registered User
88 posts

I was wondering if RSD is intended to replace RLMP or complement it. It appears you can create a wireframe in exactly the same way as you would in RLMP by using placeholders instead of the actual content. Am I meant to ditch RLMP and just use RSD? Or use RLMP to start with, then once the wireframe is complete and the foundations are laid, use RSD to go into more detail.

I am impressed by RSD. There's still a few little things that need sorting, but it is pretty amazing how easy it makes the whole responsive website creation process.

Please tell me.


VP of Software Development
49,402 posts

Responsive Layout Maker solves one of the biggest challenges in responsive design, having a flexible core which can adapt based on the viewer’s screen size. In a nutshell, Responsive Layout Maker creates a responsive prototype website (called a layout). You build the structure of your website in Responsive Layout Maker and then export to any code editor to add your final content.

Responsive Site Designer has all this and more. It can not only import your RLM project, but it can also build the structure of your website as well. This means you do not have to export your Responsive Site Designer project into an HTML editor. The big additions that RSD offers are the design layer (background images, gradients, shadow, radius, etc) and state functionality (hover, active, visited). There's more cool stuff like a web inspector tool, adding meta data and footer code, integrating and customizing font icons (1600+ icons come with the app) and more.

You see, when starting a responsive project, you should first use Layout Maker. This app helps you ease into responsive design techniques without being distracted by design details such as rounded corners, etc. That task is reserved for Site Designer. RLM makes it easy to organize the material with site elements like headings, paragraphs, buttons, and images. Then arrange, rearrange, and explore new ways of presenting the content, then adjust its appearance for all screen sizes.

Once your Layout project is completed, then you can take your RLM project and open it within Site Designer to add your styles.
Learn the essentials with these quick tips for Responsive Site Designer, Responsive Email Designer, Foundation Framer, and the new Bootstrap Builder. You'll be making awesome, code-free responsive websites and newsletters like a boss.


Registered User
88 posts

Okay, that clears up that. I wonder why the 'web inspector' is read-only though? It would be quite useful sometimes to be able to edit that generated CSS code if need be.


VP of Software Development
49,402 posts

Andrew Moss wrote:
Okay, that clears up that. I wonder why the 'web inspector' is read-only though? It would be quite useful sometimes to be able to edit that generated CSS code if need be.

You cannot have everything on day 1 Andrew!! ;)

Future versions will include more functionality.
Learn the essentials with these quick tips for Responsive Site Designer, Responsive Email Designer, Foundation Framer, and the new Bootstrap Builder. You'll be making awesome, code-free responsive websites and newsletters like a boss.


Registered User
7 posts

I agree with Andrew, being able to add code to the web inspector would be very valuable, as I have a lot of PHP elements I"ll need to implement after I finalize my design. Just to make sure & to clarify, for example, when I create a form in RSD I am only making the shell in regards to the fields. I don't see anywhere where I can add values. I'm I correct in assuming values need to be added after exporting in an HTML editor? If there is way to do it now within RSD that would be awesome!


Registered User
88 posts

Scott Swedorski wrote:
You see, when starting a responsive project, you should first use Layout Maker. This app helps you ease into responsive design techniques without being distracted by design details such as rounded corners, etc. That task is reserved for Site Designer. RLM makes it easy to organize the material with site elements like headings, paragraphs, buttons, and images. Then arrange, rearrange, and explore new ways of presenting the content, then adjust its appearance for all screen sizes.

Once your Layout project is completed, then you can take your RLM project and open it within Site Designer to add your styles.
What got me thinking is how unnecessary it is to have two programs. You said it: everything you can do in RLMP you can do in RSD, albeit with the added extras. Wouldn't it just be better to have some sort of window in the RSD preferences that allows you to choose the different styling options you can choose from in the right panel? That way you could easily take away the unnecessary things and just have the options RLMP has. Eg. if you didn't want the rounded corners, that section would be completely hidden if you uncheck the box for it. You could even have preset workflow layouts to suit the user's needs. In Dreamweaver they have something similar to this which adjusts the layout of the workspace to suit your needs.

I'm a big fan of minimilisation (keeping things simple and only having what's necessary). I think for novices out there, they will be confused by the fact there are two products and not really know what the difference is. I know that inevitably CoffeeCup will make more money by having these two products, but it's unfair to the customer.

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